Tag Archives: 2013 jamboree pioneering

Jamboree Pioneering Area: Initial Preparations

Our Inimitable Quarter Master: Benny Poedjono waits on RIck Strong.
Our Inimitable Quarter Master: Benny Poedjono waits on RIck Strong.

Ropes. For thirty different pioneering projects and structures, plenty of rope had to be measured, cut, and whipped for lashings, anchors, and guylines. We had plenty of manila and appropriate synthetic fiber rope in a variety of diameters on hand, and thanks to a well-organized storage arrangement and experienced quartermaster, ongoing supplies were readily available.

“We’ve got spars!” Of course the spars for our pioneering projects were a major consideration. Where would they come from, and how would we get them? By emailing this photo (on right) with the simple statement, “We’ve got spars!”, our director, Jim Keller let us know that spars for our projects and structures had been delivered to Garden Ground Mountain! Naturally, before we could build anything, they’d have to be skinned!

Spars were waiting to be skinned and utilized up on Garden Ground in readiness for the arrival of the Jambo Pioneering Staff.
Spars were waiting to be skinned and utilized up on Garden Ground in readiness for the arrival of the Jambo Pioneering Staff.

Skinning Spars. Starting full swing on the 11th of July morning, and continuing through the end of the 12th, amidst pouring rain with steadfast purpose and draw knives, a full crew persistently and methodically set upon the pile of heavy, hardwood spars. In spite of the tedious and often bent-over, backbreaking work, sloshing through mud in water-logged boots, spirits were high! There was something about working hard up on that mountain along with a like-minded, jovial crew that kept us going in fine form up to and after the very last spar had been relieved of its bark.

Notice how the pile is progressively getting smaller! (Photos taken in between periods of rain.) Click for larger view, and click again for detailed images.
Notice how the pile is progressively getting smaller! (Photos taken in between periods of rain.) Click for larger view, and click again for detailed images.
Spars are selected from a centrally-located area and often cut to size in accordance with the needs of each project
Spars are selected from a centrally located area and often cut to size on the spot in accordance with the needs of each project
Spars Situated and Sorted
Spars Situated and Sorted

After spars were skinned, they were transported to central locations throughout the pioneering area and selected by crews in accordance with their length and diameter to meet the material requirements for specific pioneering structures and projects. Most often, they’d be sawed to the desired lengths before being carried off to various construction sites. The total pioneering area was later dubbed: Peschke Field (named after pioneering legend, Adolph Peschke).

Why skin the spars? Basically, there are three reasons:

  1. If tied on top of bark, lashings are prone to slip, if the bark shifts or loosens under the strain during use.
  2. Skinned spars last longer than those left with the bark on. Unskinned spars are more subject to rotting from moisture and more susceptible to weakening from insects.
  3. Pioneering projects with skinned spars look really nice.
Butterfly Knots are tied in the dragging rope to form handholds.
To retrieve the poplar flagpole, butterfly knots were tied in the dragging rope to form handholds.

Transporting heavy spars. An extra long spar for the flagpole and larger-diameter spars for the climbing area had to be moved by entire crews. The 30′ poplar flagpole was dragged by tying butterfly knots for handholds in the dragging line. The uprights for the climbing area were lifted and carried by joining the ends of a rope and threading it under the log so that a series of two carriers grabbing a hold of the rope could walk the spar along on either side.

Carrying a heavy spar in pairs, along each side.
Carrying a heavy spar for the climbing area in pairs, along each side.

JAMBOREE PIONEERING AREA: MAIN PAGE

Single A-Frame Bridges at the Jamboree

A triumphant success—posing on their Single A-Frame Bridge
A Triumphant Success—posing on their Single A-Frame Bridge

In the Pioneering Area of the 2013 national jamboree, we put together a couple of Single A-Frame Bridge kits, so Scouts and Venturers could build this simple crossing bridge during their visit to Garden Ground Mountain. Each kit included:

  • two pre-constructed walkways
  • two 12-foot leg spars (shear legs)
  • one  5-foot transom spar
  • one 6-foot ledger spar
  • two pre-positioned anchors
  • four pioneering stakes
  • two guylines
  • five lashing ropes

Whenever a crew wanted to build a bridge, we provided an overview of the design and gave them a quick introduction to tying a rope tackle and the Japanese Mark II Square LashingWhat follows are some photo montages of the Single A-Frame bridges built from the kits during the jamboree. For larger and largest views, click on the photos once, and then once again:

Positioning their A-Frame in the ditch while preparing the guylines, and lashing the walkways to the transom.
Positioning their A-Frame in the ditch while preparing the guylines, and lashing the walkways to the transom.
Lashing the ledger tightly to the legs and putting tension  on a guyline.
Lashing the transom to the legs and putting tension on a guyline.
Positioning their A-Frame and hammering stakes in the corners of the walkways.
Lashing on the Transom
Lashing on the transom to the legs.
Lashing on the ledger and holding the A-Frame up while adjusting the height of the transom.
Lashing on the ledger and holding the A-Frame up while adjusting the height of the transom.
The shear lashing at the top of the legs, and lashing the ledger at the bottom.
The Shear Lashing at the top of the legs, and lashing the ledger at the bottom.
Lashing the A-Frame legs with a shear lashing, and lashing on the ledger.
Lashing the A-Frame legs with a Shear Lashing, and lashing on the transom.
Carrying their A-Frame to the ditch and placing the walkways on the transom.
Carrying their A-Frame to the ditch and placing the walkways on the transom.
Lashing on the transom and attaching the walkways.
Lashing on the transom and attaching the walkways.
Tightly frapping a square lashing for the transom and working together to join the walkways to the A-Frame.
Tightly frapping a Square Lashing for the transom and working together to join the walkways to the A-Frame.
Strop lashing the walkways to their A-Frame.
Strop lashing the walkways to their A-Frame.

On occasion, a pair of Scouts wanted to build a bridge, and with persistence, and the help of staff or friendly Scouter, they were able to get it done.

Dynamic Duos!
Dynamic Duos!

JAMBOREE PIONEERING AREA: BRIDGES

JAMBOREE PIONEERING AREA: MAIN PAGE

Related article