Tag Archives: scout staves

Scout Stave Floating Flagpole


 
A crew of Scouts went about erecting a FLOATING FLAGPOLE made entirely of Scout staves. They lashed together five staves for the pole and two staves each for the three supporting uprights. The idea was to rely upon the strain of the guylines to keep the uprights straight, without sinking them into the ground. The problem was the two staves making up each upright were just too rickety to effectively withstand the stress created during the hoisting process.

All in all, it worked, but attention should be directed to the lashings joining the stoves for the uprights. —> Use longer lashing ropes or apply three round lashings, and, make sure they’re really tight!

The USEFUL Scout Stave

A Bundle of Scout Staves
A Bundle of Scout Staves

For those interested in starting a pioneering program in their unit, it’s often suggested that one of the first things to procure is a supply of Scout Staves. The BSA Supply Division’s Scout Hiking Staff is still the best deal on the market for Scout Staves. Item: Number 1443 on scoutshop.org

  1. They’re very practical for teaching lashings.
  2. They can be used for a variety of involving and fun interpatrol competitions and Scout meeting challenges
  3. They’re exceedingly useful on outings

A SCOUT STAFF, by Robert Baden-Powell:

“The Scout staff is a useful addition to the kit of the Scout. Personally, I have found it an invaluable assistant when traversing mountains or boulder-strewn country and especially in night work in forest or bush. Also, by carving upon it various signs representing his achievements, the staff gradually becomes a record as well as a treasured companion to the Scout.

“The Scout staff is a strong stick about as high as your nose, marked in feet and inches for measuring. The staff is useful for all sorts of things, such as making a stretcher, keeping back a crowd, jumping over a ditch, testing the depth of a river, keeping in touch with the rest of your Patrol in the dark. You can help another Scout over a high wall if you hold your staff horizontally between your hands and make a step for him; he can then give you a hand from above. Several staves can be used for building a light bridge, a hut or a flag staff. There are many other uses for the staff. In fact, you will soon find that if you don’t have your staff with you, you will always be wanting it. If you get the chance, cut your own staff. But remember to get permission first.”

1. Flagpole / 2. Camp Gadget: Dish Washing Rack / 3. Uprights for Improvised Shelter / 4. Lashing Instruction / 5. Uprights for Dining Fly / Interpatrol Competition: Flag Raising Race / 7. Camp Gadget: Shear Legs for Clothes Dryer / 8. Interpatrol Competition: Catch the Snapper / 9. Interpatrol Competition: New Market Ballistas / 10. Walking Stick / 11. Camp Gadget: Simple Table / 12. Camp Gadget: Clothes Drying Rack / 13. Camp Gadget: Tool Rack / 14. Round Lashing Activity / 15. Interpatrol Competition: Free-Standing Flagpole / 16. Interpatrol Competition: (Catch the Snapper)
1. Flagpole / 2. Camp Gadget: Dish Washing Rack / 3. Uprights for Improvised Shelter / 4. Lashing Instruction / 5. Uprights for Dining Fly / Patrol Challenge: Flagpole Race / 7. Camp Gadget: Shear Legs for Clothes Dryer / 8. Patrol Challenge: Catch the Snapper / 9. Patrol Challenge: Scout Stave Launcher / 10. Walking Stick / 11. Camp Gadget: Simple Table / 12. Camp Gadget: Clothes Drying Rack / 13. Camp Gadget: Tool Rack / 14. Round Lashing Activity / 15. Patrol Challenge: Free-Standing Flagpole / 16. Patrol Challenge: (Catch the Snapper)

Some Camp Gadgets made with Scout Staves.

Scroll down for a page from the “Patrol Sketchbook” pertaining to Scout Staves in the comments section. 

Pioneering Program Curriculum II: Half Hitches and Round Lashing

This is the second post in a series that will eventually comprise an activity-based, unit pioneering program curriculum. 

SUPPORTING VIDEOS: How to Tie and Apply Half Hitches and the Clove Hitch / How to Tie a Round Lashing

Two Half Hitches Over the Top of a Pole Forming a Clove Hitch
Two Half Hitches Over the Top of a Pole Forming a Clove Hitch

II. In Pioneering, half hitches are everywhere! Two of them next to each other is a clove hitch, and that’s something we use time and time again. As John Thurman declares, “If only we can get Scouts to learn that if you make one half hitch and another half hitch and bring them together they make a clove hitch, what a lot of time the Movement would save in the amount of fiddling and fumbling that goes on when a clove hitch is the order of the day.”

OBJECTIVES

  • Scouts will demonstrate they can tie half hitches around a horizontal pole, proceeding from both the right and the left.
  • Scouts will demonstrate they can tie a round lashing by starting and ending the lashing with two half hitches.
  • Scouts will lash together two staves to make a longer pole by using two properly positioned round lashings.
Horizontal Hitching Post Lashed Between Two 6' Uprights
Horizontal Hitching Post Lashed Between Two 6′ Uprights

MATERIALS

  • Suspended horizontal hitching post or similar setup, to accommodate the entire class
  • Two or more 5-foot Scout Staves for every Scout (the more the better)
  • Four 6 to 10-foot x 1/4-inch manila lashing ropes for every Scout (the more the better)
  • 6-foot  x 1-1/2-inch diameter spar set up as a crossbar with a 6-foot length of 1/2-inch nylon or polyester cord, attached in the middle, to serve as a large visual aid

PROCEDURE A

  1. Starting at the center of the 6-foot spar, the instructor slowly ties a half hitch for all to see, proceeding from the left and initially carrying the running end over the top of the spar.
  2. The half hitch is untied and slowly tied again for all to see. This is repeated as necessary while, in like manner,  the class ties their own half hitch around the horizontal hitching post.
  3. When each Scout can tie the half hitch, the instructor slowly demonstrates the tying of two half hitches in succession. (No mention needs to be made that this is a clove hitch.)
  4. When all Scouts can accomplish this, three and four half hitches are tied in succession. Scouts give it a go.
  5. Starting again at the center, steps 1-4 are repeated on the other side, this time proceeding from the right and initially carrying the running end over the top of the spar.
Tying a simple half hitch around a horizontal pole, proceeding from the left and moving to the right: When proceeding from the left, the running end can be carried over the top of the spar, brought down behind the standing part, and then simply carried over the standing part. Dress the half hitch by pulling the standing part to the left and the running end to the right. For a second half hitch, simply repeat the process. Two Half Hitches (Clove Hitch) Three Half Hitches Four Half Hitches.
Click on the Images for LARGER Views!
Click on Image for LARGE
Click on Image for LARGER Views!
Two Round Lashings Joining Together Two Scout Staves
Two Round Lashings Joining Together Two Scout Staves

PROCEDURE B

  1. Using two Scout Staves and a lashing rope, the instructor demonstrates how, by holding in one hand the two staves and the long end of the rope as the standing part, he can tie two half hitches around both staves working with the running end. This forms a clove hitch which will start off the round lashing. It will be easy to see that since the long end of the rope will be used for the wrappings, to start the lashing, the half hitches will be applied moving towards the nearest end of one of the staves.
  2. Scouts apply the technique, tying the clove hitch around two staves in the manner shown.
  3. The instructor demonstrates wrapping the longer end tightly and neatly around both staves, leaving enough rope to finish the lashing with two half hitches.
  4. Scouts practice lashing two staves together with two round lashings. The space where the two poles are joined, gets two tight round lashings—one on either side of the overlap and right near the ends of each pole. (See photo to the left.)
  5. Scouts combine into one group and, using all the materials on hand, join all the staves tightly together into one very long pole, with round lashings.

INTERPATROL ACTIVITY: Catch the Snapper

PIONEERING CURRICULUM: MAIN PAGE

Scout Meeting Challenge: Flagpole Race

VIEW VIDEO: Simple Flagpole Raising Demonstration

Put it together, lift it up, and tie it down!
Put it together, lift it up, and tie it down!

Several campcraft skills come into play in order to successfully complete this Simple Flagpole challenge. Each patrol flies their patrol flag from a 14′ flagpole they construct using the following materials:

  • four Scout Staves (or 3 Scout Staves if their patrol flag is already tied to a 5′ pole)
  • six 6-foot x 1/4-inch lashing ropes
  • three 15-foot dining fly guylines
  • three long stakes
  • one mallet

On signal, each patrol flies their flag by:

  1. joining the staves together with round lashings
  2. attaching the three guylines about 3/4 the way up from the bottom with  roundturns with two half hitches or rolling hitches
  3. hammering in the three stakes forming an equilateral triangle
  4. tying the guylines at the stakes with taut-line hitches
  5. adjusting the tension on the lines to securely hold their flagpole in a vertical position
Patrol Flags Flying!
Patrol Flags Flying!

SCOUT MEETING CHALLENGES MAIN PAGE